Brazil - Santo Antonio by Yuki Minami

RM35.00 MYR 

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This coffee hails from the town of Rio Paranaiba located in the Cerrado Mineiro Region. Yuki Minami is a third generation coffee farmer of Fazenda Santo Antonio. This farm was founded by her grandfather, Goro Minami back in 1970s.

Her grandfather came to Brazil at the age of 11 with his parents in 1927 with a dreams of cultivating their own land. They left Japan on the 16th of June that year. First his family found work at Fazenda Promissao, in Sao Paolo and learnt the coffee farming. The pay was small. But after all the hardwork his father raised enough money to buy a small farm at Santa Mariana, in Parana State. The family worked the land together and in 1940, his father bought another piece land and planted coffee. Yuki Minami’s dad, Nicolau Minami was born.

In 1975, a heavy frost hit the Parana state and it affected the crops throughout the state. Back then, Parana state was the major contributor for the coffee production in Brazil. Nicalau left his family in search for his own fortune. Arrived in Cerrado Mineiro, he was one of the young farmers selected to be settler in the Alto Paranaiba Rural Settlement program to plant coffee there. The land was divided into 100 lots and his lot was #71. Towards the end of the 90s, Nicalau began to acquire the other lots, Lot #41 and #42. Both these lots became Fazenda Santo Antonio. Today, they own a total area of 1790 hectares.

Yuki started her life in Coffee much later. She began her career as a Marketing professional in Sao Paolo. In 2016, she entered her fathers coffee in the Brazilian Cup of Excellence competition and became a national winner. Knowing she has something in her, she left her marketing career and came back to the farm to get her hands dirty.

Yuki is now in charge of the Specialty Coffee production and at Santo Antonio, she has a plot of land where only specialty coffee is planted and process at this plot of land. That accounts to 20% of the whole farm annual output per year which is around 6000 jutes of coffee. The actual plot where this coffee was harvested is named after her.

What we have here is a natural process red catuai planted at an altitude of 1150 masl. All of the harvesting process on the farm is mechanized. Harvesting began between July to September annually. 100% of the coffee on the farm is processed using the natural method. After harvest, the cherry is sorted and the coffee is laid on a concrete patios. The cherries are checked daily to ensure over fermentation does not occur. This drying coffee is turned at least 10 times a day during the first 2-3 days of the drying process. It will take 7 to 10 days to reach the 15% to 16% moisture level. The cherries is then dried in a mechanical dryer until it reach the 11.5% moisture level. The coffee is then stored for few weeks before it is sent to the mill and pack for export.

This Brazilian is definitely different from the other cup of espressos that we tasted from Brazil. Upon grounding, we could detect nectarines aroma and pineapple aroma on the ground coffee. On the cup, we could detect the taste notes of apricot, hints of lemon and grapes in the cup with pineapple in the mid section. The coffee is juicy with a very silky body which would balance the cup when milk is added in the brew.

Varietal : Red Catuai

Altitude : 1150 masl

Process : Natural

Origin : Rio Paranaiba